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Hip

A well-functioning hip is essential for performing day-to-day activities or playing sports with ease. But, when common disorders or conditions alter their normal movement, it can trigger muscle weakness, pain or associated complications that require immediate medical attention from a qualified specialist.

At Avicenna, we understand that hip problems can greatly impact a person’s daily life and mobility. That’s why we take a comprehensive approach to diagnosing and treating these issues.

First, we begin with a thorough examination and evaluation of the patient’s symptoms. This includes taking a detailed medical history, conducting a physical examination, and ordering any necessary imaging studies such as X-rays or MRI’s.

Once we have a clear understanding of the problem, we work with our patients to develop a customized treatment plan. This may include non-surgical options such as physical therapy, medications, or injections to reduce pain and inflammation.

In cases where surgery is necessary, we specialize in minimally invasive techniques, which allows for a faster recovery and less pain post-surgery. We also use advanced technologies to ensure precision and accuracy during the procedure.

A team of orthopaedic specialists is dedicated to providing the highest level of care and working closely with our patients to achieve the best possible outcomes..

Hip Anatomy

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint located in the pelvic region, connecting the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The head of the femur, which is a smooth, rounded surface, fits into a socket called the acetabulum, located on the pelvis.

The hip joint is surrounded by several important structures that provide stability and support. The joint capsule, which is a sac of connective tissue that encloses the joint, is lined with a synovial membrane that produces synovial fluid to lubricate the joint and reduce friction. The joint is also surrounded by strong ligaments that help to keep the joint stable and prevent excessive movement in certain directions.

The femur and the pelvis are also connected by several muscles and tendons, including the gluteus maximus, the largest muscle in the body that supports hip extension and rotation. The iliopsoas muscle- a combination of the iliacus and psoas muscles, is responsible for hip flexion. Additionally, the hip flexors, such as the rectus femoris muscle, are also important for hip movement.

The hip joint is also surrounded by nerves, blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels that provide the joint with the necessary nutrients and oxygen for proper function. The femoral nerve, which is a large nerve that runs down the thigh, provides sensation to the front of the thigh and knee, and also provides motor control to the quadriceps muscle. The sciatic nerve, which is the largest nerve in the body, provides sensation to the back of the thigh and leg, and also provides motor control to the muscles of the back of the thigh and leg.

Conditions

Hip arthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects the hip joint. It is caused by the wear and tear of the cartilage that cushions the joint, leading to bone-on-bone contact and inflammation. This condition is most commonly seen in older adults, but can also occur in younger individuals due to an injury or other underlying condition.

Symptoms of hip arthritis include pain and stiffness in the hip joint, particularly when walking or climbing stairs. This pain may also radiate to the thigh or knee. As the condition progresses, the joint may become increasingly stiff and difficult to move, leading to a decrease in range of motion. In some cases, there may also be a visible deformity of the joint.

Physical therapy is usually the first line of treatment for hip arthritis. Exercises such as range-of-motion exercises, strength training, and low-impact aerobic activities can help to improve joint mobility and reduce pain. In severe cases, when conservative treatments are not effective, surgery such as a hip replacement may be necessary to improve function and relieve pain.

Hip bursitis is a condition in which the bursa, a small fluid-filled sac that acts as a cushion between bones and soft tissues, becomes inflamed. The bursa is located around the hip joint, and when it becomes inflamed, it can cause pain and stiffness in the hip joint, making it difficult to move the affected limb.

Common causes ofbursitis around the hip include overuse or repetitive motions, injury, and certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. People who engage in activities that put stress on the hip joint, such as runners, dancers, and soccer players, are at a higher risk of developing hip bursitis.

Symptoms of hip bursitis may include pain and tenderness in the hip area, particularly when moving the joint or when pressure is applied to the area. The area may also be swollen and warm to the touch. Pain may be worse when sitting or lying on the affected side.

Hip cartilage injuries refer to damage or tearing of the cartilage that lines the hip joint. Cartilage is a smooth, rubbery tissue that acts as a cushion between the bones in a joint, helping to reduce friction and absorb shock. Injuries to this tissue can occur as a result of a traumatic event, such as a fall or car accident, or from overuse and wear and tear over time.

Diagnosis of a hip cartilage injury typically involves a physical examination and imaging tests, such as an X-ray or MRI, to assess the extent of the damage.

Treatment options for hip cartilage injuries depend on the severity of the injury and the patient’s age and activity level. In some cases, non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy, medications, and rest may be sufficient to manage symptoms. However, in more severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or replace the damaged cartilage.

Hip dysplasia, also known as congenital hip problems, is a condition in which the hip joint does not develop properly. This can lead to a range of issues, from mild discomfort to severe pain and mobility problems. The hip joint is made up of the ball-shaped head of the thigh bone (femur) and the socket in the pelvis (acetabulum). In a healthy hip, the head of the femur fits snugly into the socket and the two bones are held together by a network of ligaments.

In hip dysplasia, the socket is shallow or the head of the femur is not the right shape. This means that the head of the femur does not fit securely into the socket, which can lead to instability and pain.

The condition can be present at birth (congenital) or develop later in life (acquired). Congenital hip dysplasia is often caused by a genetic predisposition, while acquired hip dysplasia can be caused by injury, arthritis, or overuse. Symptoms of hip dysplasia can include pain in the hip or thigh, limited range of motion, and a clicking or popping noise when the hip is moved. In severe cases, the hip may become dislocated.

A hip fracture is a serious injury that occurs when the thigh bone (femur) breaks near the hip joint. This type of fracture can happen to anyone, but it is most common in older adults, particularly those over the age of 60.

Hip fractures can occur because of falls, trauma, and osteoporosis (a condition that causes the bones to weaken and become more prone to fractures). In older adults, a fall from a standing height or a minor injury can cause a hip fracture, while in younger people, a high-impact trauma such as a car accident is more likely to cause the injury.

Symptoms of a hip fracture include severe pain in the hip or thigh, difficulty standing or walking, swelling, and bruising around the hip area. In some cases, the person may also experience numbness or tingling in the leg.

Hip impingement, also known as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), is a condition in which the bones of the hip joint rub against each other in an abnormal way. This can lead to pain and stiffness in the hip, as well as damage to the cartilage and other soft tissue in the joint.

FAI is caused by an abnormal shape of the hip bones, specifically the head of the thigh bone (femur) and the socket in the pelvis (acetabulum). In a healthy hip, these bones are smooth and rounded, but in people with FAI, the bones may be misshapen or not aligned properly. This can cause the bones to rub against each other, leading to pain and inflammation.

Symptoms of hip impingement can include pain in the hip or groin, stiffness in the joint, and difficulty with activities such as walking, running, or climbing stairs. The pain may be felt in the front, side, or back of the hip, and may be worse with certain movements.

A hip sprain is an injury to the ligaments that connect the bones in the hip joint. Ligaments are strong, fibrous tissues that help to stabilize the joint and keep the bones in proper alignment. When a ligament is stretched or torn, it can cause pain, swelling, and difficulty with movement.

This condition can be caused by a variety of factors, including trauma, falls, and overuse. In athletes, the injury is often caused by a sudden twisting or turning motion, while in older adults, a fall or slip can cause a sprain. In some cases, there may also be bruising or tenderness around the joint.

Moderate to severe sprains may require more extensive treatment, such as bracing, crutches, or even surgery. Recovery from a hip sprain can take several weeks or months, depending on the severity of the injury. It is important to follow a doctor’s recommendations for rest and physical therapy to help the hip heal properly.

Hip injuries can affect the muscles, nerves and tendons in the hip joint, leading to pain and discomfort. Some of the common hip tendon, muscle and nerve injuries include Piriformis syndrome, Gluteus medius syndrome, and Snapping hip.

Piriformis syndrome is a condition in which the piriformis muscle, located deep in the hip, becomes inflamed or tight, leading to pain and discomfort. Symptoms may include pain in the hip and buttock, as well as numbness or tingling in the leg. This condition can be caused by overuse or injury to the muscle, as well as certain underlying medical conditions.

Gluteus medius syndrome is another common hip injury that occurs when the gluteus medius muscle, located on the outer part of the hip, becomes inflamed or tears. This can lead to pain and weakness in the hip and thigh, as well as difficulty walking or standing on one leg. This condition can be caused by overuse, trauma, or degeneration.

Snapping hip is a condition in which a person experiences a snapping or popping sensation in the hip joint. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including tightness or weakness in the hip muscles, or a problem with the hip joint itself. This condition can cause pain and discomfort and may interfere with physical activity.

The labrum is a ring of cartilage that surrounds the hip joint and helps to keep the ball of the thigh bone (femur) in the socket of the hip bone (acetabulum). Hip labral tears occur when the labrum is damaged or torn, typically as a result of injury or overuse. These tears can be caused by trauma, repetitive motions or structural problems in the hip.

Hip labral degeneration is a condition in which the labrum wears down over time, resulting in pain and discomfort. This can be caused by factors such as age, arthritis, or overuse.

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